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Brands with Heart: new font collection with

March 12th, 2015

How do you convey to your customers that yours is a company that cares? International typeface company Monotype thinks it has the answer – with a font.

Monotype, and global branding firm Lippincott, worked together on a brief from Southwestern Airlines to develop a custom typeface and new brand identity. Southwestern was keen to convey the idea of “a maverick spirit and a passion for serving others”, and how better to do this than to somehow capture the essence of its warm, hospitable employees?

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Air Jordan jumping through hoops in copyright infringement claim

March 3rd, 2015

In 1984, sports photographer Jacobus Rentmeester took a series of photographs for a pre-Olympics feature published in LIFE Magazine. The series depicted the iconic basketball player Michael Jordan as he approached the net for a slam dunk.

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BIC Universal: handwriting for all?

February 27th, 2015

The brand name Bic is almost synonymous with its most famous invention: the humble ballpoint pen. Everyone has at least one Bic, everyone uses Bics, and while there are several variations on a theme, the standard Bic ballpoint is pretty much universal.

So if there’s a universal pen, is there is a universal handwriting? That’s a question Bic is trying to answer with its innovative ‘Bic Universal’ project.

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Parental Advisory: This Logo is Cool

February 13th, 2015

Parental advisory stickers were first introduced in the mid-1980s, after a group of parent campaigners in the US formed the Parents Music Resource Center. The group was outraged by, among others, a Prince song whose lyrics referenced masturbation.

Though not quite successful in getting their shortlist of songs banned completely, the group did pressure the US entertainment industry to release “clean” versions of songs with adult content, and to place a parental advisory notice on the front of music packaging. The current black and white incarnation of the logo remains unchanged since its launch in 1993.

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Holy smokes! Valencia drops lawsuit against comic publisher

December 12th, 2014

Last week it was announced that DC Comics, the publisher behind the Batman comics, had filed a lawsuit against Spanish soccer club Valencia to stop them using a new logo design.

Though the bat symbol has been a part of the soccer team’s branding since its inception, the design was recently revamped and a new application for copyright was made. This roused tempers at DC Comics, which countered the claim saying the logo was too similar to the Batman brand.

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5 New UNESCO Cities of Design

December 8th, 2014

Helsinki, one of the new UNESCO Cities of Design. Image by Harri Timonen, via Flickr (CC-BY 2.0)

 

Santa Fe (Mexico), Buenos Aires (Argentina), Kobe and Nagoya (Japan), Montréal (Canada), Seoul (Korea), Shenzhen, Shanghai and Beijing (China), Berlin (Germany), Saint-Etienne (France) and Graz (Austria). What do these cities all have in common?

They are the only 12 countries in the world – until now – to have been awarded the coveted ‘UNESCO City of Design’ status.

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New font helps dyslexics to read

December 3rd, 2014

People with dylexia find reading more difficult than most – but not any more, thanks to a new font developed by a Dutch graphic designer.

Himself dyslexic, Christian Boer designed the ‘Dyslexie’ font back in 2008 as part of his final thesis project at the Utrecht Academy of Art. Since then, scientists have subjected the font to rigorous testing, and found that 84% of dyslexics studied could read the font faster than other standard typefaces.

Visually, Dyslexie has been called “the chubby-ankled cousin of Comic Sans”, which doesn’t sound too appealing from a design point of view! But with 77% of test subjects making fewer mistakes when reading the new font aloud, my guess is that this font will soon catch on, particularly in educational contexts.

The font ‘works’ by making individual letters subtley more different from each other than usual. Dyslexics often subconsciously switch or flip letters with similar shapes around – letters such as ‘p’ and ‘d’ or ‘v’ and ‘w’, for example. Dyslexie gives each character a ‘lower centre of gravity’ so that they are less likely to be confused.

You can find out more about how the font works by watching this short YouTube clip: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VLtYFcHx7ec.

You can also download the font for free from Christian’s website at: http://www.dyslexiefont.com/en/dyslexia-font/.

 

About the Author:

Although her primary niche is in scientific writing and editing, freelance writer Lisa Martin is also a creative type with an eye for design. She regularly works alongside graphic designers and as such has a keen interest in the development of logos and branding.

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Let Books be Books: The beginning of the end for gender-marketed children

November 27th, 2014

British parents are leading a campaign to rid our bookshelves of children’s fiction specifically targeted either to boys or to girls.

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The Sony International Logotype Design Contest of 1981

November 25th, 2014

You’d expect a large consumer brand at the top of its game to have a huge branding and advertising budget. But back in 1981 – the heyday of the Sony Walkman – global electronics firm Sony decided to hand over a planned logo redesign to its customers.

But it turned out that crowdsourcing a logo was a really bad idea.

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Tomato sauce for Pizza Hut

November 24th, 2014

Inspired by the success of the recent rebranding of Taco Bell, now it’s Pizza Hut’s turn to get a new look.

Though the essence of the brand – the sloping, brush-stroked script and red ‘hut’ roof – will not change, the new logo is flatter, more one-dimensional and features a simpler colour palette. The new background to the red and white logo is inspired by a swirl of tomato sauce on a pizza base.

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Rainbow Apple logo throws One Direction star into

November 21st, 2014

Anglo-Irish pop sensations One Direction are never far from the media spotlight, but this week one member of the five-piece band was involved in a heated debate with a journalist – over a logo.

Louis Tomlinson, 22, heart-throb for millions of young teenage fans all over the world, was recently papped wearing a t-shirt emblazoned with the original 1977 Apple logo, featuring its then trademark rainbow-coloured stripes.

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Russia unveils World Cup 2018 logo

November 13th, 2014

The dust has barely settled on the Brazilian soccer pitches that hosted the World Cup competition this summer, but Russia has just launched the logo design for the next tournament in 2018.

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3 perils of crowdsourcing in logo design

November 7th, 2014

In the recent years, the amount of crowdsourcing companies that provide logo design services for a fraction of the price has skyrocketed, and more and more people are getting hooked on this sort of services. But is that really something to be happy about? After all, the saying goes that if something is too good to be true, it probably is. Crowdsourcing logo design is no exception – the tempting premise diverts a buyer’s attention away from several crucial flaws.

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Microsoft replaces Nokia Lumia logo

October 31st, 2014

In the late 90s and early 00s, Nokia was the ‘must-have’ mobile phone brand – who didn’t have a Nokia 3310? But, failing to keep pace with the rapidly evolving smartphone market, the cellphone arm of the Finnish comms company suffered and was sold to US tech giant Microsoft in 2014.

 

Though the Nokia logo has so far co-existed alongside Microsoft Mobile, the end is now nigh for Nokia-branded phones. Its flagship smartphone – originally branded as the Nokia Lumia Windows Smartphone, is now dropping the untrendy Nokia tag altogether.

Here’s the new Lumia branding: very definitely a Microsoft phone now, featuring the signature Microsoft flag. Interestingly, the brand name Lumia has also disappeared from the phone!

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Aerial Bold: turning topography into typography

October 30th, 2014

The brains behind an innovative new idea fusing typography with geography and computer science are seeking financial backing via crowdfunding platform Kickstarter.

German computer programmer Benedikt Groß and American geography student Joey Lee have teamed up to create the world’s first font from real Google Earth satellite images.

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